Pilatus Porter PC-6 details Pt. I.

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This is the first post dedicated to the Pilatus TurboPorter type – seen in Austrian services. Some walk around pictures will be in the beginning of the article and we will be coming deeper into details continuously. The photographic material is relatively vast so it had to be divided into several separate articles. At first we will begin with some outer details. Then, for instance the whole cockpit, opened engine compartment and further surface details will come later on.

Pilatus Porter, Austria

All these three differently “dressed” Pilatuses were standing side by side during Brumowski doors open day. You can compare their beauty here:

Pilatus Porter, Austria

– two planes wearing nice civil liveries:

Pilatus Porter, Austria

– and a military camouflaged machine too:

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army

1/ Walk around

Let us make several steps around  to meet the military bird.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Nose

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Center section

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Tail section

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Rear view, port side

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Rear view

There was no chance to continue circling the plane, because of crawds waiting for a look inside it. You do not need to worry though – this side will be documented thoroughly later :-) Now let us look closer instead.

2/ Nose & Propeller

Pilatus Porter is powered by a turboprop Pratt Whitney PT 6A-27 engine according to the info panel placed nearby. You can find this turboprop engine cutaway visiting this link.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Air intake

This is the propeller and spinner close up. Please note the multiple coloration of the prop surface.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Propeller

There were two stickers on each prop blade:

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Propeller sticker

This one is closer to to the spinner (upper picture).

Please note: the picture below is rotated 90 degrees to the right – to make the sticker better readable.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Propeller sticker

The long nose section is a typical feature of this plane. Note the color difference between the engine cowling and the section behind it:

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Cowling

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Cowling close-up

And some more cowling surface details (upper picture) and exhaust detail (lower picture). The exact placement of propeller stickers is well visible on these shots.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Exhaust detail

3/ Central section

Now we can look backwards – under the wing.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Central section with main undercarriage

This is the nice main undercarriage detail from Juraj Bojkovský (upper picture) and the pilot ‘s door close up (lower picture).

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Windshield

The typical windscreen bubble-like profile and many more inspirations to enhance your model-kits:-). Please note the pilot door’s shape.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Pilot's door

The wide cabin doors are a bit unusual too. Left-hand (port) side large cabin doors have hinges while right-side (starboard) are a sliding type instead.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Central section

Looking closer we can see the main undercarriage better.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Main undercarriage

Now let us move backwards – closer to the tail. The camera is held higher to show us the fuselage top. Numerous aerials and lights placed on the spine are always the eye catching details for every modeler.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, roof

4/ Tail section

Another very typical Porter’s feature is the large and nearly rectangular vertical and horizontal stabilizers.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Stabilizers

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Stabilizers

The camo color varied markedly in this area. You can compare the color of the whole rudder to the vertical stabilizer color for instance.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Tail, Stabilizers

a/ Rudder

This is a close up of the rudder static discharge wicks:

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Rudder Static Discharge Wicks

And the rudder trim actuator in detail:

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Rudder, Trim tab actuator

b/ Elevator

This is the far left end of the elevator with its static discharge wicks:

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Elevator Static Discharge Wicks

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Elevator, Trim details

Please also note the elevator trim actuators (upper and lower pictures).

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Elevator, Trim details

c/ Tail wheel

The tail undercarriage as seen from two different angles.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army,Tail wheel, Port side

Please also note the guard (made of rods or tubes) mounted under the fuselage and in front of the undercarriage to protect it.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army,Tail wheel

Here you can see further details concerning the tail wheel and elevator central area just behind the rudder (lower picture). The camera is in the airplane center line – looking towards the airplane nose from above the elevator.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Elevator, Tail wheel

Now the camera moved a bit closer and up:

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Tail wheel, top

And a bit closer again.

The (lower) picture was manipulated to see the structures otherwise hidden in the dark shade.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Elevator, trim mech. top

5/ Wing

a/ Wing surface details

What you see is the top-side of the left-hand (port) side wing and a flap. Please also note the skin details and color variations of  otherwise monochromatic olive green camouflage:

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wing details, top side

The same area – but in a closer look is below. Also do not miss the aerials positioned on the fuselage top.

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wing Flap

Now the camera is moving off the fuselage towards the (left-hand) wing tip to show you the whole wing trailing edge surface details…

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wing center, top

… and the elevator static discharge wicks (picture below).

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wingtip, top

b/ Wing pylon & Wing tank

When we look under the same (left-hand) wing – we can see the auxiliary wing tank attached to the wing pylon (lower picture).

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wing tank, left hand side

Wing pylon in the side view – camera is looking toward the airplane off the wing tip (picture below):

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wing pylon, Side view

The same pylon but its inner side – camera is looking toward the wing tip and (towards) the tank front end (following picture):

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wing pylon close-up

And two more wing tank shots from both sides:

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wing Tank and wing lower surface

We are looking towards the plane fuselage (upper picture) and towards the wing tip (lower picture).

Please note the flap hinge...

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wing Tank

… and the slot between the flap and the rest of the wing.

c/ Wing tip

This is the left-hand (port) side wing tip:

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wingtip

The position light and landing light locations are well visible here (upper picture). Also note the left aileron and its trim.

The position light in detail (lower picture).

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wing tip, Position light

And the landing light too:

Pilatus Porter, Austrian Army, Wing, Landing light

All the posted shots were taken outdoors – directly in front of the Brumowski Air Base air base control tower. Another Pilatus was displayed indoor – inside the maintenance hangar. This one was partly dismantled showing the engine compartment. Visitors were able to enter the cockpit too. Don ‘t worry – everything was documented thoroughly of course – and will be posted here later, as was promised above.

Post Scriptum: This info-panel (picture below) placed next to the plane at Brumowski Base can serve all of you who like to know the main Pilatus Porter data and its role in the Austrian army:

Pilatus Porter Info Panel

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Images Copyright © 2013 by Marcel Meres & Juraj Bojkovský.
Text Copyright © 2013 by Marcel Meres.

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